The Unofficial Linux Thread

Midgardsormur

Posts: 638

Posted:
Edited: by Midgardsormur
Posted: -
Welcome to the unofficial Linux discussion thread. Whether you're a Linux user or not you're welcome to join our discussion with any questions and thoughts you may have burning on your mind, or if you just want to share the love.

This first post is reserved for Star Citizen specific and related FAQ whereas the next few posts below this one may be more "general", a good read if you would like to know more about Linux (without any specific relation to Star Citizen).

Several threads have been merged with this one, so it may be confusing to read through it from this page to the last. Unless you're enthusiastic enough to read the whole thing from start to finish, feel free to just jump to the last one or two pages to join the talks.


Will Star Citizen come to Linux?



Yes!

CryEngine finally has Linux support which was the only thing CIG was waiting for according to the last we heard from Chris Roberts on this subject (7:58).

0.jpg


So it is coming, and it is probably coming soon.



How does Linux's gaming performance compare to Windows?(Drivers)



Check out this Nvidia driver based SteamOS vs Windows benchmark just to see that the Linux GPU drivers are quite competitive with the Windows ones. Alternatively for something more straight to the point, here is a benchmark with GTX 670 and 550-Ti on Linux vs Windows driver performance including OpenGL 3.2 on both Windows and Linux and DX11 on Windows.

Here's an AMD Catalyst benchmark (not on SteamOS though) Gallium3D is the open source driver which is not suitable for any real gaming in Nvidia's(nouveau) case, but in AMD's(radeon) case the Gallium3D driver can on rare occasion outperform AMD's proprietary catalyst drivers. AMD are fixing this though, look up their new open source AMDGPU kernel driver for Radeon R9 285 and newer cards.

In graphical performance (which gaming is all about today) both Nvidia drivers and AMD drivers for Linux are very competitive with the Windows ones to the level that neither is better than the other, as is. But I've seen common claim in Nvidia's case that their drivers outperform the Windows ones, as well as that they actually removed functionality from them to reduce their linux drivers capabilities down to the level of Windows on several occasions.

Peripheral device support is also decent as far as I can tell, and Valve is working to even further improve peripheral device support. Any Xbox360 emulating controller will work plug and play out of the box like you'd expect them to. No comment on HOTAS setups from me though (would be nice if someone has experiences with that and could comment). But at least, Oculus Rift works.

As for DirectX12, we will have Vulkan instead.

Can Star Citizen be run through Wine?



TL;DR: No. The major fault here is that Wine does not yet support DX10/11 (but this is in progress)
The best place to look for whether Wine supports a game or not is through it's AppDB you can see from here (after searching Star Citizen, or Hangar Module) that the hangar module will not run as it requires DirectX 11. DX11 support is being worked on by Wine devs though. Wine is not perfect and it can be a bother to configure it, especially to those who don't know how. If you want to use wine for running Star Citizen or anything else, chances are you will need to give yourself a few hours to learn how to properly use it. I recommend Steam's brand new In-Home Streaming service as a great alternative to Wine for gaming (if you have the resources)

For the hardcore, there is also the quite recent VGA-Passthrough technology (more here)

Where do I go to ask to join the Star Citizen Linux Alpha/Beta?



The Linux announcement is still just that; an announcement. There is no official Linux alpha/beta planned yet, and quite frankly we don't know when it will be or how it will be handled. But as is, here is the unofficial thread for it.

Are there any Linux organizations in Star Citizen?



Yes there are, currently the known ones are:
Linux User Group
Steam Linux User Group
Linux For Everything
Order of the Dragonfly

If you have a Linux organization that you want me to add to this list, shoot me a PM or comment it in this thread and I shall add it to the list.

Other Star Citizen Q&A



Is a linux build of the game in progress? (May1; Apart from the server, no. Not yet)

Will the game come to Mac? (Ben Lesnick: Not confirmed) Do not lose hope Mac folks, Mavericks finally added long awaited support for OpenGL 4.1 and Crytek has announced CE support for Macs coming as well.

I want to try out Linux, where should I start?



There is a free online course on linux it used to cost around 2400$
You could also start in this below post. :)


Where else can I go to keep track on Linux outside of Star Citizen?



Phoronix is one of the most popular news pages for Linux.
GamingOnLinx is also a popular news page for Linux but dedicated to gaming.
The Official Linux Homepage

Hope this info helped :)
UN3C3IR.png
  • Midgardsormur

    Posts: 638

    Posted:
    Edited: by Midgardsormur
    Posted:
    Edited:
    Post 2 and down are not as tied to being SC specific as the first post, but these might be an interesting read for you if you are interested in Linux one way or another. More Q&A!

    First, have an avatar by Citizen Star News' artist created for their interview with LUG.
    Q1eaOhd.png

    What is the status of Linux' market share?




    Statistics show that it's marketshare on the PC is currently low. This seems to be slowly changing right now, but Linux wins over others in market share on other platforms, like smart phones(Android) and the vast majroity of servers and supercomputers also use it. Even smart TVs.

    The upcoming Steam Machines challenging the console market with Valve's SteamOS(Linux) as its operating system should also mean increased marketshare for Linux on the gaming side of things.

    Statistics aren't everything, a lot of Linux users (including me) use Windows alongside with Linux bringing up Windows' marketshare in comparison to Linux, in theory there could be a lot more people that use Linux than any statistics suggest but only a limited amount that uses Linux exclusively. As a fellow gamer I'm sure you can relate to the feeling that you will use any OS no matter how much you hate it if it is a requirement to play your favorite games. There's a good post on subject here, and a video in the next one.

    How many games are there really on Linux?




    Steam recently hit a whooping 500 games, this has all happened very fast mind you. Just February 2013 we only had 60 games on steam, it's barely been a year and we now have over 500. To see an up to date game count on steam, go here.About 50% or more of all upcoming indies I see seem to have Linux support, the Triple A's have been very slow about coming over to Linux (naturally as big companies always take their time, but many have announced stuff) the two biggest game engines out there (UE4 and CE) are being ported to Linux as we speak (meaning any games made on them can run on Linux if the developers are up for supporting it)

    Game Engines

    AAA Capable game engines:
    CryEngine (In Progress <- This is Star Citizen's game engine)
    Unreal Engine 4 (In Progress, but it is being ported lightning fast)
    Unity
    Source (picture Portal 2 and Half Life 3)

    Triple A Games:

    Released Triple A games on Linux:
    Valve's Games (Dota 2, Team Fortress, Portal (1 & 2), L4D(2), CS (1.6, CZ, Source), Half Life 1, 2 & 3(confirmed!), Gmod)
    The Witcher 2 (A port that will only play well on Nvidia, in fact it will only play at all on Nvidia)
    Civilization V
    Wargame (Strategy Series)
    Planetary Annihilation (Spiritual successor of Total Annihilation and Supreme Commander, I would argue that it is AAA quality)
    Painkiller Hell & Damnation (Borderline AAA)
    Serious Sam 3
    Brutal Legend (\m/) (we also have Psychonauts)
    X3 (Space Sim you guys should all know about, the predecessor of X: Rebirth which is also coming to Linux I think)
    XCOM: Enemy Unknown
    Metro: Last Light
    Europa Universalis (Borderline)

    There are also tons of older games that were triple A in their time on DOS (Dosbox yo!) like Wizardry 6 & 7 and Lands of Lore and all that nice stuff. Even Elder Scrolls 1 & 2 should work. There are also 3D games that just aren't quite AAA anymore like Quake 4 and Broken Sword, Rune and many more. And most games that are between that DOS and Windows Vista period will run better in Wine on Linux than in "Compatibility Mode" on Windows.

    Triple A Games:

    Upcoming AAA:
    Star Citizen
    The Witcher 3
    Oddworld: New 'n Tasty (remake of Abe's Oddysee by the original authors)
    Limit Theory (Not quite Triple A, but almost)
    Unreal Tournament 2014
    Kingdom Come: Deliverance
    War Thunder
    Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel

    Honorable Mentions:

    Indies that were pretty damn popular:
    Kerbal Space Program
    Prison Architect
    Amnesia and Penumbra (series)
    Crusader Kings II
    Killing Floor
    Natural Selection 2
    Rust
    Dust: An Elysian Tail (Microsoft published furry game anyone?)
    Starbound
    Trine 2
    Bastion
    FTL
    Football Manager 2014
    Dungeon Defenders (Not Normal Tower Defense)
    Defender's Quest (Normal Tower Defense)
    Anomaly (Reverse Tower Defense series)
    Overgrowth
    Democracy 3
    Mark of the Ninja
    Tabletop Simulator
    Ren'Py Games (Long Live the Queen, Loren TAP, Analogue, Magical Diary, Heileen...)
    Beat Hazard (Asteroids meets Audiosurf) and Symphony
    Anna & Gone Home
    World of Goo
    Fez & Super Meat Boy

    And don't forget that now that Steam is allowed to be run on two computers at a time, you can run Steam on WINE and Steam on native linux side by side (meaning you can actually play most of these other games on Steam that don't officially support Linux)
    UN3C3IR.png
  • Midgardsormur

    Posts: 638

    Posted:
    Edited: by Midgardsormur
    Posted:
    Edited:

    I want to try Linux!




    So then you want to try out Linux, being eager is fine, but don't jump in head first, plan ahead and consider your options before you dual-boot or even wipe off your Windows/OSX.

    There is no way I could fit a full blown Linux tutorial into one page, it's like teaching someone who never saw a smartphone before how to use both Android, iOS and Windows 8 simultaneously. But I think this is a good starting point to pick out how and where you want to start in your journey to discover the awesomeness of Linux.

    The first step is to look into what distributions you think look cool (scroll down).

    The second step is deciding how you want to test them. You can either set up a Virtual Machine or you can create and boot from a distro's "Live CD/DVD/USB" (If you don't know how to make one, google, it's most likely easier to do than to set up a VM)

    Both are risk-free ways to try out Linux, however, in both cases the performance may not be representative of the performance you will get from a physical installation on an SSD/HDD.

    The third step is when you think you're ready to install it, find the distros installation guide and follow it.

    A Window Manager(WM) or Desktop Environment(DE) is a fancy term for GUI or Graphical User Interface of the system in question, in Linux you can pick and choose what GUI you will use for your system, which is essentially the look and feel of your computer.

    I will now give you a list of the main distros to know about when you're beginning to look into Linux with screenshots of their respective default DEs.

    Keep in mind that most of these screenshots are just one of many possible configurations.


    The Simple: Ubuntu

    lY7rKxX.png
    Canonical has goals comparable to Apple, if you like Apple's software, you're likely to like Ubuntu too. Ubuntu uses the Gnome based Unity as it's DE. Canonical want to give users a framework that is highly simple and easy to use, but for some users there is such a thing as "too simple". It's all preference. This is also known to be the most highly supported Linux distro, (most software developers target Ubuntu for support when releasing to Linux) but that focus may very easily shift to SteamOS soon.


    The Stepping Stone: Mint

    jZuFEQy.png
    Linux Mint can serve as a really nice stepping stone for former Windows users since it's DE, Cinnamon is the most comparable to Windows out of most I've found. Other such DEs may include KDE and XFCE. I would consider this OS the ideal replacement for Windows XP.


    The Heavyweight Champion: OpenSuse

    B3tvykA.jpg
    (I added in a few gawidgets to the shots because I thought it was cool)
    OpenSuse uses KDE which is a windows-like DE, but it is also arguably the heaviest (consumes most resources) DE around. I recommended OpenSuse rather than Kubuntu since I usually hear that OpenSuse offers the best KDE experience out of all distros.


    The Lightweight Champion: Bodhi Linux

    bJhPUDB.jpg
    (Art by Elsevilla, GUI personalized by me with the default theme for Enlightenment)
    Bodhi's WM, Enlightenment is rather magical. It is one of the most beautiful environments you'll ever find, with cool compositor(graphical) effects and everything, but it is also lightweight, meaning it is a candidate for running on weak systems (old computers and netbooks to name two). Its hard to know which distro is the lightest, Bodhi simply has the best shine vs speed factor.

    The minimal requirements are 300mhz CPU and 128mb of RAM, now that's low. Only use this if you're up for customizing everything from the UI to the keybinds and mouse functionality. (Enlightenment is extremely configurable)

    Enlightenment is rather experimental, so other lightweights to look into if it is not for you are Lubuntu and Xubuntu and Crunchbang.


    The Tried and Tested: Debian

    OARJvki.png
    (2 screenshots split by the corners to show the application launcher and the desktop itself)
    Debian is one of the oldest distros still around, and it is the mother of many others, Ubuntu and SteamOS to name two are based on Debian. Debian's selling point is that it is one of the most stable Linux distros around, and it is suitable for Enterprise, Server hosting just as much as it is for an average user, it has a learning curve, but if you come to Linux in hopes of finding a system so stable that it nearly cannot be crashed, Debian might be the one for you. Note however that out of all the distros I'm naming, Debian is running on the oldest kernel making it the least likely to play well with the latest hardware and technology unless you use the unstable branch. It's DE is known as GNOME 3.


    The Minimalists: Arch Linux and Gentoo

    A minimalist distro is one where you do not start with a GUI, all you get is a terminal and you must install your own WM and most programs you want to use (you only get a barebone system so to speak) this makes them the most customizable distros out there (they're not tailored towards any specific use, you just turn them into what you want them to be)

    The most popular minimalist distros are Arch and Gentoo these distros are only for advanced users, however! They both have more accessible variants (which are not as hardcore, but still offer the same amount of freedom) such as Funtoo and Manjaro (as well as Archbang), and I hear Manjaro is quite user friendly, so you should definitely try it out if "freedom" is a word that appeals to you.

    If you want to jump straight to the deepest end of the pool, this is where you want to start. Installing and using one of these is the fastest way to become familiar with the terminal and customizing under-the-hood stuff through it. Gentoo is considerably harder to use than Arch so in all cases I recommend you try Arch first then try Gentoo when you've become comfortable with Arch. (Trust me on this, you don't want to start in Gentoo because it compiles all programs from source, and this means installing stuff can take a very long time, i7 and a wellspring of patience helps, I started with Gentoo but moved to Arch because my patience ran out)


    Pro Tip: Remember to install and configure a firewall like iptables + ufw.


    Software Choices




    In Linux it is more important than ever before to actually know what programs you do and don't want to use. Here are a few quality picks. to give you an idea. Don't let me decide for you though.

    Browsers: Google Chrome and Firefox work.

    Movie Players: VLC and Mpv, sadly the latter has no GUI yet, but I use a player called "bomi" which is a fork of it, quality is comparable to MadVR + MPC.

    Music Players: List!

    Image Manipulation: GIMP, Inkscape, Krita, Mypaint, Blender(3D)

    Text Editors: Sublime, Gedit, (IDEs:) Eclipse, Codeblocks. Monodevelop(C#)

    Office Packs: LibreOffice, OpenOffice

    Torrent: Qbittorrent, Deluge

    Communications: Skype(4.2), Teamspeak, Mumble, Pidgin(Check this one out), Irc Clients, Mail Readers, and all that stuff.

    Screen Recording: ffmpeg (really have had better experiences recording with this than anything I used on Windows, more graphical ones on the list I linked to earlier as "screencast")

    Sound Editing: Audacity

    It also has things like productivity and finance managers and stuff you generally never knew existed.

    UN3C3IR.png
  • Midgardsormur

    Posts: 638

    Posted:
    Edited: by Midgardsormur
    Posted:
    Edited:

    What is so good about Linux?




    I'll try to make this short but sweet with a list:
    • Freedom & Fun! It is the most "fun" operating system, and by that I mean it can be customized and "played with" without any limits. Android was made from Linux for a famous example, a lot of smart-tvs use Linux as well. You can make Linux be whatever you want it to be but it sometimes may take a bit of effort to do so. Customizing Linux is about as fun to me as playing a video game, have fun with it! Of course the nice bonus here is that you can make it look cool.

    • Security! It is extremely secure compared to OS X and Windows. If you still believe that OS X is virus free you should know that this was never true and in fact it is quite hard to clear a virus out of OS X once it's in due to lack of anti-virus software. One thing that keeps Linux very secure against viruses is it's open source nature which allows anyone who sees a security flaw in the system to patch it out. This means that most of the time if a virus on Linux is "known" someone somewhere will find a way to render Linux immune to it. Out of all mainstream operating systems, Linux offers the highest "out of the box" security both in the sense of digital and physical threats (such as hard drive and personal data encryption from the moment you install it and advanced firewalls) and this can be further boosted by using a security-centered distro!

    • Free! It is free to use. You'll be hard pressed to find a Linux distribution that you "must" pay for (they do however exist), and the vast majority of programs are free too!

    • Easy! Linux is as simple or complicated as you want it to be you're the one who has the choice here, one nice perk here is that unlike windows where you will install your OS and then need to install drivers afterwards, all your stuff will usually work out of the box in Linux, there are a few exceptions to this rule of course, I won't lie, but usually it is not as much trouble as in Windows. In Linux thanks to the package managers, when you update your system you will also be updating every single program installed in your system.

    • No Maintenance! There is no need for "maintenance" on your Linux system like on windows which gets slower and slower over time. Maintenance on windows includes most of the time cleaning your registry and defragmenting your hard drives as well as restarting regularly. You do not need to do this in Linux, it will be as fast as it was on day one after 10 years even if you never restart inbetween. The only reason you ever have to shut down/restart your Linux system is if you want to update the kernel, but you don't really ever need to do this, if you don't want to. (Many people don't, but it's not like it's a pain to do it and it doesn't nag you about restarting either like windows does)

    • Low Requirements! As I said above in Bodhi's requirements, you can run Linux on even your crappiest oldest computer usually without any problems. It has hardware support back into the mid 90s or so. so if you've got a computer from that period or newer, it'll probably work. This way you can bring your old systems back to life and use them for something (I use an ancient relic of a laptop as a teamspeak 3 server host with Linux, works like a charm since it's got a battery that can survive power outages!)

    Good to know




    This section is more info for those who just want to know more about Linux than what I gave in the above post.
    • In Linux you don't install programs like you do in Windows or Macs by simply downloading a file, double clicking it and then spamming a "next" button, you use software called "package manager" learn to use this, it's actually quite convenient once you get used to it.

    • In Linux people traditionally use "workspaces" which can be explained as multiple desktops. In the bottom centre of my Bodhi screenshot above you can see a "pager" which is an application used to switch between these desktops, if you look closely each one has a different wallpaper and applications running on it. The perk of this is that you don't need to rely so heavily on alt+tab anymore, and you can do many jobs at a time (like browsing on one desktop, programming on another and drawing art on the third) this is extremely convenient and I find it hard to live without this on Windows where it does not exist in a reliable form.

    • The Meta/Windows/Command key works as a modifier (like Ctrl or Alt) in Linux, it actually does this in Windows too but nobody knows about it (hehe), it was a recent development however that certain DEs (Cinnamon and Unity to name 2) allow you to use this button to open their application launchers like you would in Windows. If you don't like these DEs there is a workaround called ksuperkey which works very well once you've set it up (there is a tutorial somewhere on the net)

    • When you run into a problem and search the web for a solution, chances are the solution will be given to you in a form that can be executed through the terminal, while you are new to Linux this may very well be frustrating to you but the reason is simply that you can't provide a solution to a problem to thousands of people that all have a different user interface, the one thing all Linux distributions have in common is that they have a terminal (bash by default)

    • Using Linux for the first time may make you feel a bit "claustrophobic" simply because you are unfamiliar with it.

    • If you want to fully make use of Linux's customization potential and become an advanced user, you are going to need to get comfortable with using the console/terminal and you are going to need to get a minimalist distro like Arch or Gentoo. This is not as hard nor scary as it sounds, but it doesn't happen overnight and it is not for most people (if you're an advanced user on Windows though, you are likely to want to go this route, and it won't hurt badly to jump straight to the deep side of the pool)

    • The most useful button on your keyboard when using a terminal in Linux is "Tab" it serves as "Auto-complete", your other best friend is the 'man' command which is short for manual. So I want to know how the 'tar' command works (for zipping and unzipping files) so I type in 'man tar' and I get a nice little manual which I can press "Q" to close.

    • The notorious "Elitists" are people who seem to expect beginners to know how to troubleshoot problems from day one. (Expect everyone to be an expert) They expect you to have read the man pages and to post your settings and logfiles. This is btw not much to ask. They may seem unfriendly at first, but in reality they really are trying to help you, so be polite and patient towards them! They are doing the same for you to begin with!

    • It is a good idea to get good at creating and managing partitions through virtualbox so that you will not risk deleting your own files when you install Linux physically, Windows has a function to "shrink" partitions from it's disk management utility which you can use to create space for a Linux partition.

    • What I've told you is just the tip of the iceberg, here are a few more noteworthy distros: (Still just the tip of the iceberg)
      • ElementaryOS(Ubuntu Alternative)
      • Fedora(Aimed at developers)
      • SteamOS (Aimed at gamers) there is also Sabayon.
      • Qubes-OS(Aimed at security freaks)
      • CentOS(Aimed at servers and enterprise)
      • Tails(Aimed at web-anonimity)
      • Kali(Aimed at security experts(*cough*); successor to Backtrack)
      • IpCop(Advanced Firewall)
      • SystemRescueCD (Name says it all)
      • TinyCore (A 15Mb distro that runs faster than lightning (faster than SSD))
    • For the closest thing to a complete list of distributions, try distrowatch.
    UN3C3IR.png
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:
    SNES you say? Hmmm... I demand a new thread title!
  • ChainsawCarpenter

    Posts: 168

    Posted:
    Edited: by ChainsawCarpenter
    Posted:
    Edited:
    And what kind of threadtitle it should be or in what category this thread should be in?
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Edited: by zirlo
    Posted:
    Edited:
  • CynicalCyanide

    Posts: 6807

    Posted:
    Posted:
    0ni | 0ni said:
    [hide]

    Crytek is hiring openGL programmers for the express purpose of porting. As of this date the link now says vacancy filled, I'm not sure when it happened exactly but it's been a couple months now.

    How do you know if the hire was for the express purpose of porting?
    Great minds talk about ideas. Average minds talk about things. Small minds talk about people.|My PC Hardware Guide: http://tinyurl.com/lxfhuvu |VTS is recruiting!.
  • 0ni

    Posts: 1119

    Posted:
    Edited: by 0ni
    Posted:
    Edited:
    [hide]

    0ni | 0ni said:
    [hide]

    Crytek is hiring openGL programmers for the express purpose of porting. As of this date the link now says vacancy filled, I'm not sure when it happened exactly but it's been a couple months now.

    How do you know if the hire was for the express purpose of porting?
    1. That's what it said before the post was filled. Although I failed to take proper record of it, so you're just going to have to believe me.
    2. http://www.crytek.com/career/offers/overview/frankfurt/programming-engineering/linux-programmer
    ________________________________________________________________^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Cascadia_Sig.png

    Ahhh, the internet. Where Men are Men, Women are Men, and kids are usually cops.

    -Captain_Trips
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Edited: by zirlo
    Posted:
    Edited:
    archive.org didn't catch it in time, but ubuntuforums.org user Zeven posted an excerpt on 09-07-2013:

    [...]

    The CryEngine team is looking for a Programmer to work on the Linux version of the 3d engine.

    Responsibilities:

    • Maintain Linux support for CryENGINE.
    • Contribute to maintenance and improvements of low-level engine systems.
    • Ensure reliability of Unix based build systems for SDK releases and special projects.
    • Create and maintain modules to be used for automated testing.
    • Contribute developer documentation based on on-going developments.
    • Participate in the development of game prototypes and custom solutions for external partners.
    • Provide support and training to internal and external developers.
    • Show a strong passion for customer service and satisfaction.
    • Take initiative and be willing to expand own horizon.
    • Adhere to all company policies and procedures.
    • Safeguard company assets including source code, artwork, tools, game design information and technical know-how.

    [...]


    Edit: It should also be noted, however that when someone brought up the job advertisement on the drydev forums , the community manager had this to say:

    Nothing to announce from our side. Should that change, you would probably hear about it more prominently than in a random forum thread.

  • ChainsawCarpenter

    Posts: 168

    Posted:
    Posted:
    [hide]

    I'm sorry for the confusion, it was meant to be a joke about SNES support. Hardware's fine. Let's move on and gather facts. Thanks for opening the thread by the way.

    Sorry, that was my fault - didnt catch your drift. Now i see the point. My english is not so good as it should be !
  • guibo

    Posts: 4

    Posted:
    Posted:
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:

    We plan to release the game on all major platforms: PC, MAC, Linux and next-gen consoles. If you pledge for Baron tier and above, you will be free to choose any platform the game will be released on as your reward. Regarding Early Access to the game, at the moment we can guarantee it only on PC, however we will do our best to make it available on as many other platforms as possible.

    That's really vague. Applying their definition of 'PC', they don't seem to promise anything.
    I'd say it's good news nonetheless: Another studio working with CryEngine wants to support operating systems besides Windows.

    Thank you, guibo.
  • ChainsawCarpenter

    Posts: 168

    Posted:
    Posted:
    Cryengine on Mac should be possible, if you delete some details like occlusion for the restriction of OpenGL3.1.
  • Victor_Tramp

    Posts: 395

    Posted:
    Posted:
    Speaking of, It turns out there WILL be CryEngine games for Linux,

    reported here: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTU4MjI

    and here's the game's Kickstarter page, note the released platforms in the summary:
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1294225970/kingdom-come-deliverance

    Cloud Imperium, ball's in your court. Will you really let these upstarts beat you to the title of First CryEngine game for Linux?

    ;)
    Waiting patiently for the Linux version since 2012.
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Edited: by zirlo
    Posted:
    Edited:
    To everyone interested in Linux and Mac support: Please consider posting new information to [Request] Supporting Linux, Mac OS X and OpenGL 4.3. Part 2.

    It's getting very hard to keep track of all the different threads floating around.
  • Lacressian

    Posts: 1515

    Posted:
    Posted:
    Forget about SC going Linux. The game is tied with so many peripherals that are not supported by Linux that it will be pure suicide for CiG to venture that road. Be reasonable!
  • Luieburger

    Posts: 50

    Posted:
    Edited: by Luieburger
    Posted:
    Edited:
    [hide]

    Forget about SC going Linux. The game is tied with so many peripherals that are not supported by Linux that it will be pure suicide for CiG to venture that road. Be reasonable!

    Ummm... I have zero issues with peripherals on Linux. It actually has better support for devices out of the box than Windows does. Don't spew FUD.
    [hide]

    Speaking of, It turns out there WILL be CryEngine games for Linux,

    reported here: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=MTU4MjI

    and here's the game's Kickstarter page, note the released platforms in the summary:
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1294225970/kingdom-come-deliverance

    Cloud Imperium, ball's in your court. Will you really let these upstarts beat you to the title of First CryEngine game for Linux?

    ;)

    YES! I came here just to share this same info. I just pledged to Kingdom Come Deliverance because of the Linux support on Cryengine.

    Looks like Cryengine DOES support Linux, and RSI should follow. I'm not saying that Star Citizen should be released on Linux at the same time as it is released on Windows since that would be unreasonable, but eventually Star Citizen should be released on Linux.
    Long live the Newell World Order!
  • Luieburger

    Posts: 50

    Posted:
    Edited: by Luieburger
    Posted:
    Edited:
    [hide]
    Yep. I came here to share this same info. It looks like we'll have several CryEngine games coming to Linux. I'll back all of them.

    Now... Linux + Cryengine + Mantle + Oculus? We can only hope.

    As for the concerns about funding and where it should go... the primary goal of Star Citizen is to make the best damn space sim, and push the limits of PC gaming to its maximum. If you know of a more efficient and better performing operating system than Linux, I'm all ears. Otherwise, now that Cryengine is definitely supporting Linux, I consider Star Citizen on Linux to be part of our primary goal.

    I knew there must be a good reason why I backed this project at the Vice Admiral level.
    Long live the Newell World Order!
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:
    I'm sure some of you have already seen this:

    A publicly available image file shows the schedule for last week's Steam Dev Days, a non-public event hosted by Valve. At the very least it shows nVidia's efforts to utilize OpenGL for optimization:
    "Beyond porting", by Cass Everitt (via dsogaming.com)

    I wasn't able to dig up the AMD slides, but there was a presentation with a similar title at AMD's Developer Summit in november, in case you're interested in perfstudio2: Optimizing Game Development using AMD’s GPU PerfStudio 2, by Gordon Selley


    Also, while searching for the AMD slides, I came across the Honorable Sean Tracey's presentation at the AMD summit: CRYENGINE and AMD bringing the next generation now, by Sean Tracey (via http://developer.amd.com/apu/home/sessions/)

    One paragraph in particular caught my attention:

    Playstation® 4, Playstation® 3, Xbox One™, Xbox 360™, Wii U™ and PC all-in-one game development solution with scalable computation and graphics technologies. Optimized for Dx11 and Consoles with big announcements to come of further platform support.

    It's of course entirely possible that he's talking about tablets and smart phones.

    It would be dubious at best to conclude anything from those sources - but the plot thickens.
  • Rogue_Maverick

    Posts: 18

    Posted:
    Edited: by Rogue_Maverick
    Posted:
    Edited:
    I've actually got BSGO and SC to work on a linux system. but my frame rate was ridiculously low and slow.
    like freezing glitchy slow.
    what I did was run a windows 8.1 virtual machine on VMware in a Kubuntu 13.10 64 bit OS.
    results were so far un acceptable. having big issues with 3-D rendering
    meanwhile, I keep toggling between hard drives on a duel boot system.
    I'm running duel quad core xeon 3.0 GHZ (8 physical cores total), 24 GB ram, and an HD6870 GPU
    I was able to dedicate 4 cores and 12GB of ram to the win 8.1 virtual machine and get it to go.
    I'm thinking my bottleneck is my hard drive at the moment. working on a new in stall.
    going to get a 240GB SSD for the root and boot Kubuntu system I love.
    keep as an aux my 1TB mechanical hard drive I currently have, and when i re install win 8.1 I'll create it's C: drive as a file on the mechanical drive.
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:
    Well, that's not the craziest thing one could do with a vm and I applaud your commitment, but personally I think there are better ways to make good use of excess processing capacity.
    You may want to have a look at Star Citizen SETI@home Exploring (Asteroids@home-MilkyWay@home) for example.
  • iTz-Malevolence

    Posts: 240

    Posted:
    Edited: by iTz-Malevolence
    Posted:
    Edited:
    [hide]

    I've actually got BSGO and SC to work on a linux system. but my frame rate was ridiculously low and slow.
    like freezing glitchy slow.
    what I did was run a windows 8.1 virtual machine on VMware in a Kubuntu 13.10 64 bit OS.
    results were so far un acceptable. having big issues with 3-D rendering
    meanwhile, I keep toggling between hard drives on a duel boot system.
    I'm running duel quad core xeon 3.0 GHZ (8 physical cores total), 24 GB ram, and an HD6870 GPU
    I was able to dedicate 4 cores and 12GB of ram to the win 8.1 virtual machine and get it to go.
    I'm thinking my bottleneck is my hard drive at the moment. working on a new in stall.
    going to get a 240GB SSD for the root and boot Kubuntu system I love.
    keep as an aux my 1TB mechanical hard drive I currently have, and when i re install win 8.1 I'll create it's C: drive as a file on the mechanical drive.

    If your aim is to run Star Citizen in a virtual machine, avoid VMware (except ESXi I've heard isn't too bad) and have a look at bare metal hypervisors like KVM and Xen.
    I've just successfully fixed my KVM set up and have set up a Windows virtual machine with my HD 7950 passed through the virtual machine.
    At the moment I'm just downloading SC hanger module and will post a shot of it completed.
    Honestly with other games that I've tried, example, Bioshock Infinite and Borderlands 2 and a few others, I can see no difference in performance drop from dual booting Windows.
  • CDT_Aphex

    Posts: 3

    Posted:
    Posted:
    +1 Linux
    Imperium Recruitment
  • ChainsawCarpenter

    Posts: 168

    Posted:
    Edited: by ChainsawCarpenter
    Posted:
    Edited:
    Someone ever tried a vm with 3D Drivers installed? You have to start in safe mode to install them! I try it tomorrow.
  • h3llb0und

    Posts: 29

    Posted:
    Edited: by h3llb0und
    Posted:
    Edited:
    I'm primarily a Windows user, but +1 for Linux.

    I'm not sure this should be called a port? Shouldn't it be just OpenGL support?
    Anyway, If you look at some of the games on Steam that are also available on Linux, you will notice some if not most of them got a performance boost when compared to Windows.

    Example:
    L4D 2 Windows vs Linux performance comparison

    Tested on Highest details

    Average FPS on Linux: 55
    Average FPS on Windows with Razer Game Booster - ON: 43
    Average FPS on Windows with Razer Game Booster - OFF: 24

    Linux Mint 14 64 bit - Mate
    Windows 7 64 bit

    So yeah, I'm thinking of having a Linux Partition just for some games like SC :P

    Edit: A blog by the Valve Linux Team
    http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux/faster-zombies/
    Corsair 750D | i5 3570K @ 4.4GHz | Corsair Hydro H60 | ASRock Z77 Extreme4 | Gigabyte R9 290X 4GB Windforce OC Edition | G.Skill Ripjaws 1600MHz 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3 | Crucial MX100 512GB SSD | Corsair RM-750 | Dell Ultrasharp 2711 2560x1440 | Corsair K95
  • iTz-Malevolence

    Posts: 240

    Posted:
    Edited: by iTz-Malevolence
    Posted:
    Edited:
    These a couple of photos showing my setup. I'm using a KVM and passing through a HD 7950 to a Windows 7 Virtual Machine on top of Arch Linux. Following this guide but doing a few different things: https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=162768&p=1

    Pictures (Sorry for the phone camera terrible quality): Image 1 Image 2 Image 3 Image 4
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:
    Just a thought: Shouldn't there be a seperate linux virtualization-related thread, so this one does not get too cluttered?
    It could potentially also be used for discussing virtual private game servers.
    The other route, wine, is already covered by multiple threads, Star Citizen Hanga/er on Linux with wine for example.
  • iTz-Malevolence

    Posts: 240

    Posted:
    Posted:
    [hide]

    Just a thought: Shouldn't there be a seperate linux virtualization-related thread, so this one does not get too cluttered?
    It could potentially also be used for discussing virtual private game servers.
    The other route, wine, is already covered by multiple threads, Star Citizen Hanga/er on Linux with wine for example.

    Good point Zirlo. I'll probably start a new thread showing what I did to get VGA passthrough working.
    Ideally though I really would prefer to see a native linux binary of the game when released.
    Knowing me Star Citizen would probably be the last game I'll ever play meaning I'll probably be too addicted to leave it and hence never touch Windows again.
    So really virtualisation and even wine is just a workaround for us linux users. Rather than dual booting.
  • Aonoa

    Posts: 6

    Posted:
    Edited: by Aonoa
    Posted:
    Edited:
    There is also Cradle which say they will support Linux and they use CryEngine, just like Kingdom Come: Deliverance. :-)

    Hooooray for Linux!

    When I hear Star Citizen is getting a Linux client, is also when I will pledge support.
  • zirlo

    Posts: 463

    Posted:
    Posted:

    There is also Cradle which say they will support Linux [...]

    I hate to be a buzzkill again, but what they actually say in their faq is:

    We do intend to support Linux.

Sign In or Register to comment.